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Eiffel Tower terror scare could have been parachute jump

The Eiffel Tower in Paris was shut to all visitors this morning after three ‘terror suspects’ with ‘large rucksacks’ had allegedly been seen ascending France’s most popular tourist attraction. Anti-terrorist police supported by a helicopter could be seen at the iconic landmark following the alarm being raised in the early hours. But after a search that went on all morning it was thought they had escaped via parachute – prompting a theory that they had been extreme sportsmen all along. It has long been a dare, lark and thrill for people to jump off famous structures without permission.

© 1985 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and Danjaq, LLC
© 1985 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and Danjaq, LLC

The Eiffel Tower was featured in the 1985 James Bond film ‘A VIEW TO A KILL’ where the filming of a daring parachute jump was overshadowed by two stuntmen making an unauthorized jump. Just before the jump off the Tower was to be undertaken for the film, two thrill-seeking members of the public made an unauthorized jump off Paris’ famous landmark and got arrested. Because of that, authorities initially revoked the permission for the Bond crew to film the stunt. Serge Touboul, the production manager in France, smoothed over the incident with Paris authorities and the Bond crew got permission to go ahead with filming the parachute stunt.

© 1985 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and Danjaq, LLC
© 1985 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. and Danjaq, LLC

The first of the film’s jumps, performed by seasoned stuntman B.J. Worth, was so successful that the second jump was canceled thereby eliminating any further risk, cost and time. However, as mentioned in Inside ‘A View to a Kill’ (2000), two of the crew, including B.J. Worth´s backup stauntman Don ‘Tweet’ Caltvedt, allegedly went and made an unauthorized jump at 7 in the morning as they were apparently so disappointed that they didn’t get to jump off the Eiffel Tower. They were unaware of the fact, that the film crew, including director John Glen, had already been up the tower to test camera angles. The non-permitted stunt jump cost them their jobs as it jeopardized the remaining filming of the shoot in the French capital.

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